The Regulator of Social Housing has found that two local councils have breached the Home Standard, with one housing association being placed under review.

Newark and Sherwood District Council “failed to complete hundreds of gas safety checks and, as a result, was in breach of statutory health and safety requirements. The council has put a programme in place to rectify this issue.”

After a self-referral, the regulator found that on gas safety, “more than 1,000 properties had not received a gas safety inspection within the statutory timeframe. Although the inspections were typically overdue for a relatively short period of time almost 20% of Newark and Sherwood DC’s homes were affected.”

The regulator added: “Newark and Sherwood DC notified the regulator as the issue emerged and has put in place a programme to rectify these failures and is reducing the number of overdue gas certificates. The regulator will therefore not take statutory action at this stage, as it has assurance that the breach of the standard is being remedied.”

Angela Holden, Assistant Director of Consumer Regulation at RSH, said: “We welcome Newark and Sherwood District Council’s self-referral, which recognises that its failure to meet health and safety requirements has put tenants at potential risk.

“We expect the council to put things right for tenants and return to compliance with our standards. We will be monitoring them closely as they do this.”

The second council breaching the Home Standard was Great Yarmouth Borough Council. Also after a self-referral, the regulator found that “the council failed to meet statutory requirements for fire, gas, electrical, asbestos and water safety”.

On fire safety, the judgement says: “A recent fire safety management review commissioned by the Council found that FRAs in place were neither suitable nor sufficient and could not be relied upon. As a result, Great Yarmouth BC is completing new FRAs for all of its stock. This amounts to almost 200 FRAs. The Council also identified a small number of high risk actions overdue for at least six months.”

After an internal audit, the council found more issues, such as “failings across these areas of health and safety compliance. This included a lack of reconciliation between management systems. This meant the Council did not have up to date records of health and safety compliance and therefore did not have assurance that all required checks and remedial actions had been undertaken.”

Concluding its judgements, the RSH said: “Great Yarmouth BC has put in place a programme to rectify these failures and the regulator will therefore not take statutory action at this stage, as it has assurance that the breach of the standard is being remedied. The regulator will work with Great Yarmouth BC as it continues to address the issues that have led to this situation, including ongoing monitoring of how it delivers its programme.”

Angela Holden, Assistant Director of Consumer Regulation at RSH, said: “We welcome Great Yarmouth Borough Council’s self-referral to us, which recognises that it failed to meet requirements for fire, gas, electrical, asbestos and water safety.

“Our investigation confirms that the council breached our standards and put tenants at potential risk. We expect the council to correct these failings and we will monitor them closely as they put things right for tenants.”

Elsewhere in the judgements, the RSH placed ForHousing on its gradings under review list as it is “currently investigating a matter which may impact on ForHousing’s compliance with the governance element of the Governance and Financial Viability Standard”.

An outcome judgement will be made in due course.

Paul Kennedy, Chair of the ForHousing Board, said: “We are committed to working closely with the Regulator to provide the additional assurance required as part of their review. We will continue to focus on delivering quality services to tenants and work in partnership to improve lives.”

The regulator also handed out a range of retentions, with Metropolitan Thames Valley, Sanctuary Housing and Guinness Partnership all keeping their G1/V2 ratings, with Durham Aged Mineworkers’ Homes Association keeping its G1/V1 rating.