Most Brits comfortable living next to social housing, survey

The UK public’s attitudes towards social housing have been revealed – and more people than not say they would be comfortable living next to it.

The British Social Attitudes Survey, which measures changes in the public’s attitudes, values and beliefs, found that 41% of people would feel comfortable living next to social housing, while 24% said they’d feel uncomfortable, and 31% said they’d feel neither comfortable nor uncomfortable.

The survey, which was run between July and November 2018, also found that only 30% of owner occupiers would feel comfortable living next to social housing, the group most uncomfortable with it.

Meanwhile, 73% of social renters say they’d be comfortable (though goodness knows what the other 27% are thinking when they actually live in social housing merely than next to it). Among private renters, 46% said living next to social housing wouldn’t cause the any undue alarm.

Geographically, Londoners are less likely to report they'd feel uncomfortable living next to social housing than people living in the rest of England, with only 17% of those in the capital bothered by such a thing.

Younger people were found to be more comfortable than older people, with 53% of 18-25-year-olds saying they wouldn’t have a problem.

But the comfort level drops with the age groups: 36-45 (40%); 46-55 (37%); 56-65 (35%); 66 and over (38%).

Elsewhere, 47% of people with a long-term illness or disability said they’d feel comfortable living next to social housing, while only 37% of those without a long-term illness or disability said they’d be happy to.

In the world of work, 27% of those with a job would feel uncomfortable while only 7% of unemployed would be bothered.

As for social housing allocations, 34% thought decisions tend to be unfair; 23% thought decisions tend to be fair; and 24% thought allocations are neither fair nor unfair.

For loads more detail, read all the findings here.