Understanding abusive and controlling relationships

You are probably working with, or have worked with, someone who has various concerns but has not put them together to make the link of ‘coercive control’.

Understanding abusive and controlling relationships

Domestic abuse isn’t always physical. Coercive control is an act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse that is used to harm, punish, or frighten their victim.

Alison, has used her clinical training and experience of working with survivors of domestic abuse to design this workshop for staff who work with survivors of domestic abuse and who want to understand more in order to better support clients.

The training aims to equip staff to identify coercive control, understand the practical implications for victims and provide support and sign-posting to those who disclose.

What the session covers:

  • What does a controlling relationship look like?
  • Why some people control their partners
  • Why some partners stay
  • Cycle of abuse
  • Physical and sexual violence
  • Questions to ask clients
  • Helping vs taking over
  • Recovering from coercive control – the traumatic impact
  • Access to specialist support.

Who should attend?

This training is aimed at staff who want to develop their understanding of working with this client group, and those new to support work in specialised services. Ideally as a refresher and for staff new to this area of work.

Alison Markantonis

Income management Alison Markantonis

Alison Markantonis is an experienced welfare benefits, financial capability and employment skills practitioner, who has worked successfully in the affordable housing and benefits sector for the last 27 years. She has worked with many housing and support organisations and brings her extensive experience to specialise in demystifying the benefits system, money management and employability skills training for both frontline staff and tenants. Her approach is participative and interactive, using case studies and her own experience to take the complex, and make it not only simple, but also applicable.